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Feedback for Building Relationships, Building Bridges: Library Outreach and Marketing to Latino and Spanish-Speaking Families, March 2014 session

We would like students to leave their public feedback, or reviews, for the now completed March 2014 session of Building Relationships, Building Bridges: Library Outreach and Marketing to Latino and Spanish-Speaking Families, taught by Katie Scherrer. Participants’ feedback will help us know how we can improve, and also to give others a sense of what our classes are like. Thanks!

Feedback for Information Architecture, March 2014 session

We would like students to leave their public feedback, or reviews, for the now completed March 2014 session of Information Architecture, taught by Susan Teague-Rector. Participants’ feedback will help us know how we can improve, and also to give others a sense of what our classes are like. Thanks!

Feedback for Transforming and Querying XML, March 2014 session

We would like students to leave their public feedback, or reviews, for the now completed March 2014 session of Transforming and Querying XML, taught by Robert Chavez. Participants’ feedback will help us know how we can improve, and also to give others a sense of what our classes are like. Thanks!

Feedback for Feminist Pedagogy for Library Instruction, March 2014 session

We would like students to leave their public feedback, or reviews, for the now completed March 2014 session of Feminist Pedagogy for Library Instruction, taught by Maria Accardi. Participants’ feedback will help us know how we can improve, and also to give others a sense of what our classes are like. Thanks!

Feedback for Bringing Library Services to Mobile Devices, March 2014 session

We would like students to leave their public feedback, or reviews, for the now completed March 2014 session of Bringing Library Services to Mobile Devices, taught by Scott La Counte. Participants’ feedback will help us know how we can improve, and also to give others a sense of what our classes are like. Thanks!

Feedback for Fair Use in Depth, March 2014 session

We would like students to leave their public feedback, or reviews, for the now completed March 2014 session of Fair Use in Depth, taught by Gretchen McCord. Participants’ feedback will help us know how we can improve, and also to give others a sense of what our classes are like. Thanks!

Feedback for Data Management, March 2014 session

We would like students to leave their public feedback, or reviews, for the now completed March 2014 session of Data Management, taught by Jillian Wallis. Participants’ feedback will help us know how we can improve, and also to give others a sense of what our classes are like. Thanks!

Interview with Mimi O’Malley

Mimi O’Malley oversees development and delivery of professional development courses and workshops through The Learning House, focusing on higher education faculty and administrators. She has also presented workshops on online learning topics like faculty assessment, ADA, copyright, and curriculum trends. Next month she will be teaching a course for Library Juice Academy, called Embedded Librarianship in Online Courses. Mimi agreed to be interviewed here, to give people more of an idea of what her course will cover, and a bit about her background as an instructor.

Mimi, thanks for agreeing to do this interview. I’d like to start by asking you to tell us a bit about your background and how you found your way to the position of teaching this course and ones like it?

I spent 2 years working in the training department of an online learning company. My main task is to teach faculty best practices for teaching fully online courses, engaging students while teaching online, and online course design. I actually wrote the content I had to teach, so I saw whether or not the content I wrote and course navigation was useful for students (in my case, my students were faculty). I found my way to Library Juice Academy through the Special Libraries Association. I was helping the solo division feature organizations useful for their solo librarians and Library Juice courses were one professional development resource recommended.

Sounds like you have a good background for teaching this course. Why don’t you give an outline of it?

This class will start with simple ways librarians may embed their skills remotely starting with the LMS especially through the use of portal tabs, blocks, eReserves, knowledge bases, and student/faculty orientations. We’ll then move on to discussing how to bring the traditional face-to-face BI session (which librarians know so well) into the online class through the use of team teaching, guest lecturing, and conducting synchronous workshops. We’ll explore in the 3rd week how the librarian can become more influential in online course design and development. The session concludes with an examination of the ways librarians can evaluate whether or not their virtual efforts are impacting student access to library resources as well as possible learning outcomes.

Since you focus on online learning in higher education and work with faculty who are involved in that, you are in a position to be in tune with what is going on. I wonder if you could tell us what some of the new trends are in online education that librarians need to know about in planning to be more “embedded online.”

I would recommend embedded librarians become acquainted with their institution’s copyright policies for online courses. This includes understanding if your school applies fair use for online course design (some do and some do not), verify if you school adheres to TEACH Act, and general policy regarding who is responsible for seeking permissions/license (faculty or library)? MOOCs are a hot topic, but it doesn’t seem to have a strong business model for many schools to invest in development. Keep accessibility in mind…librarians are advocates for making sure individuals have access to information and this includes individuals with disabilities.

Sounds like good advice. I’d like to switch gears for a final question: If you could teach any other classes for Library Juice Academy, what do you think they’d be?

Great question. I think taking this workshop’s 3rd module, “Identify librarian roles during the design and development of online courses,” and developing a four week workshop might work well. I could see focusing on topics such as publishing digital content, open education resources, seeking permission, and learning tools interoperability. Those could be a few topics to delve into.

Sounds great. Thanks for being willing to do this interview.

Thanks for the opportunity to promote this workshop. I think librarians stand to gain more leverage when they can see opportunities which exist in distance learning. The librarian skill set is very compatible with this field since they recognize varied learners require varied learning experiences, remain vigilant on technology changes, and understand the juxtaposition between proprietary and open source resources.

Interview with Robin Hastings

Robin Hastings is the Director of Technology Services for the North East Kansas Library System. She manages the library’s network, social media, and staff training initiatives there. She has taught a course for Library Juice Academy on project management, and will be teaching it again next month. Robin agreed to be interviewed here, to give people more of a sense of what they can expect to learn from the class, and a little bit about her.

Thanks for agreeing to be interviewed, Robin. To start out, I’d like to ask you to tell us a bit about your background, and how you came to teach a class in project management.

Thanks, Rory. I’ve been working in libraries for 15 years now and have been leading projects in those libraries for the last several. I started at the Missouri River Regional Library in 1998 as the assistant to the Computer Services manager, eventually becoming the IT Manager there. While in that position, I led our library’s changeover to the Google Apps service at the same time I led the switch in our Public Computer Center from the SAM time management program to Envisionware. Between those two projects and the others that followed, I immersed myself in the idea of project management – I wanted to be able to consistently complete projects for the library successfully and so I read and attended many different classes and workshops on project management in general. I also started to use the GTD (Getting Things Done) time management system and it has a project focus as well, so it all kind of came together for me. I’ve written a couple of articles and posts on managing projects using both traditional and GTD-based project management methods and have led a couple of workshops on the topic as well, so when I had the opportunity to do it in the online environment, I jumped on it!

Sounds great. So why don’t you give us an outline of the class? What will people come away from it knowing or being able to do?

The class begins with a brief lesson on what project management is, what the various types of project management methods are and how they can relate to projects in a library. I focus the rest of the class on traditional project management, but touch on how GTD-based project management and Agile project management handle the issues involved with managing projects as well. The meat of the class is in the 5 phases of project management – I take each of those phases and relate them to real-life projects that the students are doing – many past students have left the class with a complete set of project documents to help them navigate a real project they are working on. I also provide an “example” project for students to use if they don’t have one of their own to use in class. We go through each of the 5 phases, with lots of templates and example documents for them to use as starters for their own projects and then finish the class up with discussions of how to apply the project mindset to their libraries. Every student leaves the class with lots of tools to help them in future projects for their library.

Can you describe how these tools helped you complete projects effectively and efficiently in your library?

Mostly, the tools I use for project management help me plan out projects in a thorough and consistent way. Going through each of the phases of the project management method makes me consider all the bits and pieces that will be required by a project up front, so that I can be sure to plan for each of them. Also, having the documentation from previous projects to refer back to when starting a new project is incredibly helpful. It takes just a couple of projects under your belt to make you a firm believer in documenting and saving project materials!

What is the range of projects in a library where a project management approach can be helpful?

That’s a great question and one I try to cover in the class! If you use the GTD method of project management, anything that takes 2 or more steps (looking for phone number, making a call) is a project. The more traditional use of project management methods, though, is on anything that will take more than 10 or 20 hours. There is some overhead in using these methods – documentation and such – so pulling out a project charter and work plan for something that will take just an hour can be overkill. Anything that requires any planning, though, is fair game. Usually, the bigger projects – from implementing a new service in the library to website design/redesigns to new building projects are perfect for project management activities. I’m not sure I’d use this approach to creating a planning document like a strategic plan, because you’d spend all your time planning to plan, but for just about anything else, project management helps keep your projects under control. Another thing I stress in class is that few projects (maybe a new building project, not much else) requires all 45 steps in a full, traditional project management process. Pick and choose what will be helpful and ignore the rest!

This sounds like a very helpful class. I’d like to change gears though and ask you about your other interests and activities in libraries. What are your other interests?

In libraries? I’ve always worked on the techie side of libraries, so I’m very interested in public access computing issues, tech planning and patron education about libraries and technology. I’ve always believed that people who support the folks doing the various jobs around the library should get their hands dirty and do those jobs occasionally too, so I’ve worked my share of circulation desk hours, a few reference desk hours and even put some time in at the teen zone in my old library. I really think that what we do in libraries is important work and I like to do my part to keep them running smoothly and providing service to everyone. Outside of libraries? I read. A lot. I also knit and play a bit of World of Warcraft. I cook, too, but I’m still just a dabbler. ;)

So, a question that I often ask in these interviews, which relates to your other interests. If you could teach any other class for Library Juice Academy, what would it be?

There are a couple that come to mind, actually. Because of my experience working so many different desks, I have a real interest in customer service in libraries – walking that fine line between serving the patron in front of you and still being a good steward of the library’s resources. The other topic that immediately springs to mind is a “what you need to know about technology to lead a library” sort of thing. I do a month-long module on that sort of thing for new library directors in Kansas – expanding that to cover all the things that library leaders and leaders-to-be should know about the technology in their libraries would be a fun class to lead!

Both sound potentially interesting. Thanks for your time and willingness to be interviewed. I hope you have another good class next month.

Thank you, Rory, for providing me the opportunity and platform for doing this! I’ve learned something from the folks who take my class every time I’ve taught it and I hope to continue learning (and passing that stuff on, of course) in future classes!

Feedback for Designing a Usable Website (Concepts of User-Centered Design), February 2014 session

We would like students to leave their public feedback, or reviews, for the now completed February 2014 session of Designing a Usable Website (Concepts of User-Centered Design), taught by Carolyn Ellis. Participants’ feedback will help us know how we can improve, and also to give others a sense of what our classes are like. Thanks!

Feedback for Getting Started with Digital Image Collections, February 2014 session

We would like students to leave their public feedback, or reviews, for the now completed February 2014 session of Getting Started with Digital Image Collections, taught by Beth Knazook. Participants’ feedback will help us know how we can improve, and also to give others a sense of what our classes are like. Thanks!

Feedback for How ILL Works, February 2014 session

We would like students to leave their public feedback, or reviews, for the now completed February 2014 session of How ILL Works, taught by Debra Lucas-Alfieri. Participants’ feedback will help us know how we can improve, and also to give others a sense of what our classes are like. Thanks!

Feedback for Introduction to GIS and GeoWeb Technologies, February 2014 session

We would like students to leave their public feedback, or reviews, for the now completed February 2014 session of Introduction to GIS and GeoWeb Technologies, taught by Eva Dodsworth. Participants’ feedback will help us know how we can improve, and also to give others a sense of what our classes are like. Thanks!

Feedback for Student Staff Development, February 2014 session

We would like students to leave their public feedback, or reviews, for the now completed February 2014 session of Student Staff Development, taught by Jeremy McGinniss. Participants’ feedback will help us know how we can improve, and also to give others a sense of what our classes are like. Thanks!

Feedback for Techniques for Student Engagement in Library Instruction, February 2014 session

We would like students to leave their public feedback, or reviews, for the now completed February 2014 session of Techniques for Student Engagement in Library Instruction, taught by John Doherty. Participants’ feedback will help us know how we can improve, and also to give others a sense of what our classes are like. Thanks!