Deconstructing the Low-Morale Experience in Academic Libraries

$175.00

Credits: 1.5 CEUs or 15 PDHs

Employing the use of reflective writing/aesthetic expression, assigned readings, and community participation, this course will offer opportunities for analysis, critique, and reflection on the low morale experience.

Clear
Category:

Course Information

Session

Credits

1.5 CEUs or 15 PDHs

Course Description

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick’s 2017 study on low morale in academic librarians revealed the social, environmental, and systemic impact factors of this phenomenon. Implications for ethics, collegiality, professionalism, continuing education, and career mobility were also linked in this groundbreaking qualitative study. Simultaneously, literature on workplace incivility, toxicity, burnout, and bullying reflect a critical need for dialogue about, reflection on, and recovery from low morale outcomes suffered in academic library environments.

Employing the use of reflective writing/aesthetic expression, assigned readings, and community participation, this course will offer opportunities for analysis, critique, and reflection on the low morale experience.

At the end of this course, participants who have experienced low morale in academic libraries (or other library environments) will be able to:

  • Make sense of their low morale experience(s);
  • Identify, reduce, or interrupt the role of occupational and systemic barriers to resolving low morale; and
  • Identify and cultivate leadership behaviors that decrease low morale in academic (or other) library environments.

Trigger warnings: Participants will be asked to revisit instances of low morale they have faced. As a result, negative memories and associated emotions, including anger, grief, and shame, may (re)-surface.

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick

Kaetrena Davis KendrickKaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S. earned her graduate degree from the historic Clark Atlanta University School of Library and Information Studies. Stemming from a decade of professional experience, Kendrick's research interests include professionalism, ethics, racial and ethnic diversity in the LIS field, the impact of creativity on library development and leadership, and the role of digital humanities in practical academic librarianship. She is co-editor of The Small and Rural Academic Library: Leveraging Resources and Overcoming Limitations (Chicago: ACRL 2016) and author of Kaleidoscopic Concern: An Annotated, Chronological Bibliography of Diversity, Recruitment, Retention, and Other Concerns Regarding African American and Ethnic Library Professionals and Global Evolution: An Annotated, Chronological Bibliography of International Students in U.S. Academic Libraries (ACRL 2009, 2007). In 2019, Kendrick was named the Association of College and Research Libraries’ Academic/Research Librarian of the Year.

Special Session

Please contact us to arrange a special session of this class for a group of seven or more, with a negotiable discount, or to be notified when it is next scheduled.

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Be the first to review “Deconstructing the Low-Morale Experience in Academic Libraries”

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.